global Collections®

Building New Resources for Area and International Studies

Please log in or sign up to access all resource details and interactive features

Proposals A-Z

Participating librarians and scholars provide information here about collections, archives and data sets of interest to area and international studies (AIS) research, propose preservation of those collections and the creation of new digital resources from data sets, and vote on the merits of those proposals. Community input provided here informs and guides the building of new AIS resources.

C

Conde de Montemar Letters (1761-1799)

This project consists of digitizing the first two boxes (roughly 50 letters) and creating a virtual portal containing the original mages, semi-diplomatic transcriptions, comprehensive metadata scheme, and different historical essays that will contextualize the letters in Andean and Spanish American history.

Source Format: 
Paper
Target Format: 
Digital
Updated: 
Mar 1, 2019 10:33am

Cuban-American Radionovelas in the Louis J. Boeri and Minin Bujones Collection

160 reel-to-reel audio tapes selected from the Louis J. Boeri and Minín Bujones Collection of Cuban Radionovelas housed at the Latin American Library at Tulane University will be converted from analog to digital format.  They will then be hosted on Tulane's Digital Library. These materials are among the more than 9,100 masters of recordings of radio programs produced and broadcasted by America’s Production Inc. out of Miami during the 1960s. They constitute a unique research resource that is currently trapped on aging, unstable audio tapes with moderate to severe condition issues and inaccessible due to a lack of functioning playback equipment.

Source Format: 
Audio
Target Format: 
Digital
Updated: 
Oct 3, 2018 11:05am

D

Digital Archive of Latin American and Caribbean Ephemera

The Princeton University Library (PUL) sought support from the Latin Americanist Research Resources Project (LARRP) for digitizing an extensive hidden collection of ephemeral materials from Latin America.  The proposed 3-year pilot project is an essential step in the larger process of making the digitally reformatted ephemera freely and globally available through a discovery interface which will include faceted searching and browsing.  Outcomes of the 3-year project are approximately 12,800 digital objects with accompanying item-level descriptive metadata, deployment of a scalable, sustainable and replicable model for timely online disclosure of similar collections with a robust...

Source Format: 
Paper
Target Format: 
Digital
Updated: 
Oct 2, 2018 3:44pm

Digitizing Peru's Print Revolution

This project proposes the digitization of an initial corpus of rare nineteenth-century Peruvian serials, ephemeral circulars, and popular song and verse imprints held in the José E. Durand Peruvian History Collection at the University of Notre Dame’s Hesburgh Libraries. These unique materials support new scholarship on diverse political and cultural topics in Peruvian history. They also offer new insights on the worldwide nineteenth-century revolution in print culture, providing fodder for comparative work by scholars across disciplines. The materials included in this first corpus date to the first half of the nineteenth century. They will be digitized and enhanced with OCR. They will then be slated for incorporation into the Libraries’ repository that allows users to...

Source Format: 
Paper
Target Format: 
Digital
Updated: 
May 2, 2019 4:36pm

F

Fondo Real de Cholula

The project will digitize and describe 25 boxes, comprising approximately 27,000 pages, from the Fondo Real de Cholula, a one-of-a-kind collection of documents providing insight into how indigenous residents of Cholula navigated colonial judicial structures over the span of four centuries.  The project partners with the Archivo Judicial del Estado de Puebla, and employs three local historians to digitize and describe the collection.  Logistical and technical support, as well as long-term preservation and access infrastructure, will be provided by LLILAS Benson Latin American Studies and Collections (LLILAS Benson), in collaboration with the University of Texas Libraries (UT Libraries).

Source Format: 
Paper
Target Format: 
Digital
Updated: 
May 2, 2019 4:37pm

M

Mexican and Argentine presidential messages, 1821-1993

Proposal to convert and upgrade the digital collection of Mexican and Argentine presidential speeches from the 19th century orginially scanned by the Latin Americanist Research Resources Project (LARRP).

In 2000, LARRP converted over 75,000 frames of microfilmed Spanish-language government documents to digital format. The material was originally microfilmed by the Library of Congress (Argentina) and LAMP (Mexico) on LARRP's behalf. The converted materials were hosted by LANIC at the University of Texas at Austin as GIF files, with larger TIFF files available for downloading.

We propose to harvest the TIFF images from LANIC/Texas (with permission) and to re-process the files to capture full text  (OCR) and related metadata.

Source Format: 
From Digital
Target Format: 
Digital
Updated: 
Jan 14, 2019 3:17pm

S

Spanish Sociolinguistic Research Collection, 1978-1992

The project includes two online digital collections of audio recordings of Spanish sociolinguistic corpora from Santiago, Chile, and Southern California from the late 1970s and the early 1990s. The recordings, which total 156 hours, were created by University of Southern California professor emerita of Spanish, Portuguese, and linguistics Carmen Silva-Corvalán. They were recorded on original audiocassettes—the majority of which are now nearly 40 years old—and include: 1) 93 hours of recordings from 49 Spanish speakers in Santiago, Chile, during 1978 and 1992; 2) 42 hours of Spanish-language recordings from 47 Mexican-American speakers from various age groups in Southern California in 1976; and 3) 21 hours including much code-switching between Spanish and English by 16...

Source Format: 
Audio
Target Format: 
Digital
Updated: 
Oct 3, 2018 11:06am


While CRL makes every effort to verify statements made herein, the opinions expressed and evaluative information provided here represent the considered viewpoints of individual librarians and specialists at CRL and in the CRL community.  They do not necessarily reflect the views of CRL management, its board, and/or its officers.